Download Loan Phonology by Andrea Calabrese, Leo Wetzels (Eds.) PDF

By Andrea Calabrese, Leo Wetzels (Eds.)

For lots of varied purposes, audio system borrow phrases from different languages to fill gaps of their personal lexical stock. The prior ten years were characterised via an excellent curiosity between phonologists within the factor of ways the nativization of loanwords happens. the overall feeling is that loanword nativization presents an instantaneous window for gazing how acoustic cues are classified when it comes to the special positive factors correct to the L1 phonological method in addition to for learning L1 phonological techniques in motion and hence to the real synchronic phonology of L1. the gathering of essays offered during this quantity offers an outline of the advanced concerns phonologists face while investigating this phenomenon and, extra commonly, the ways that strange sounds and sound sequences are tailored to converge with the local language’s sound development. This ebook is of curiosity to theoretical phonologists in addition to to linguists attracted to language touch phenomena.

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Loan Phonology

For plenty of various purposes, audio system borrow phrases from different languages to fill gaps of their personal lexical stock. The prior ten years were characterised via a superb curiosity between phonologists within the factor of ways the nativization of loanwords happens. the overall feeling is that loanword nativization presents an instantaneous window for watching how acoustic cues are labeled by way of the unique beneficial properties suitable to the L1 phonological method in addition to for learning L1 phonological tactics in motion and hence to the genuine synchronic phonology of L1.

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Paul Boersma & Silke Hamann dorsal plosives, despite the fact that they are less often released than dorsals (Rositzke 1943:41; Crystal & House 1988; Byrd 1992; Y. Kang 2003) or labials (Y. /, respectively. Kang explains this special behaviour of coronals as a paradigm uniformity effect related to the alternation that we discuss below in §5; Kang’s proposal is plausible, but we do not attempt to give a formalization of this paradigm uniformity effect here. 4â•… Conclusion In §3 and §4 we have provided an account of all four processes involved in loanword adaptation, without proposing any loanword-specific mechanisms, especially without any loanword-specific ranking of Depâ•‚V.

For instance, we meant the constraint *[h]/−asp/ to refer to an English-like aspiration noise of 80 ms (Lisker & Abramson 1964:394). e. [h˜], are possible (in fact, they are typical of Korean /th/: Lisker & Abramson 1964:397, Kagaya 1974:168) and will even be less likely to be perceived as /−asp/. 2). Working this out in full detail for the continua of aspiration noise and F0 is beyond the scope of this paper, whose focus is on vowel insertion. A more complete, ‘principled’, set of cue constraints than we could provide here appears in the next paragraphs, where we address the perception of the somewhat more straightforward auditory vowel height continuum.

Respectively. This is indeed a view that is widely held in theories on loanword adaptation (Silverman 1992; Yip 1993; H. Kang 1996; Yip 2006). With Y. Kang (2003), however, we regard it as unlikely. The next section explains why. 1 we asserted that the listener’s perception process is defined as an attempt to retrieve the speaker’s intended surface form. If this is correct, the Korean interpretations of the English final sound sequences [˜:Ѐ€Å:] and [kÐ_kh] are unlikely to be just the segments /k/ and /kh/.

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